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May 21, 2010

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cloud minder

yes,and BP has also recently bought segments of our public universities too:

http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-washburn24mar24,0,6286060.story

including University of California and institution that still denies full rights to whistleblowers

http://theaggie.org/article/2009/10/19/vetoes-of-higher-education-reform-bills-cause-turmoil

In July 2008, the California Supreme Court ruled (Miklosy v. the Regents of the University of California (S139133, July 31, 2008) that UC employees who are retaliated against because they report wrongdoing cannot sue for damages under the state’s Whistleblower Protection Act, so long as the University itself reviews the complaints in a timely fashion. The ruling uncovered an oversight made by the Legislature when the Act was amended in 2001, which provided legal standing for all other state employees to seek damages.

“This is the classic case of the fox guarding the hen house,” said Yee. “UC and CSU executives should not be judge and jury on whether or not they are liable for monetary claims. This was not the intent of California’s whistleblower law.”

In the Miklosy decision, three of the seven judges urged the Legislature to consider changes to the law, as the current statute undermines the purpose of the Act.

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