« Continuing Security Concerns at Los Alamos National Laboratory | Main | Confirming Chuck Spinney »

Mar 01, 2007

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c68bf53ef00d83522c65369e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Cyber-security at Risk:

Comments

brian adams

SEEKING INFO FOR ATTORNEY THAT HANDLED THE CASE

Alex

How can something so outrageous still happen post 9/11? The Sandia managers involved should be fired and prosecuted. How come this story was not headline news? These people at Sandia are out of control.

eldoradosun

URL: http://www.abqjournal.com/news/metro/395764metro10-05-05.htm


Wednesday, October 5, 2005
Sandia Bosses Secretly Tapped Workers' Calls
By John Fleck
Copyright © 2005 Albuquerque Journal; Journal Staff Writer
Security managers at Sandia National Laboratories routinely recorded telephone and radio conversations of other security workers for at least two years, an Energy Department investigation has found.
Conversations with people outside Sandia also were recorded without their knowledge or consent.
The Inspector General's investigators found no national security justification for the recordings, and no authorization.
Instead, calls "on issues relating to leave, overtime, training, scheduling, and discipline" were routinely recorded without workers' consent, the investigators found.
The report said DOE had determined the practice was not in compliance with policy and that there were "similar issues at Los Alamos National Laboratory." A final report has not been issued for LANL.
According to the investigators' report:

Audible "beep" tones in the recording machines, intended to inform people they were being recorded, were disabled.

Files of recorded conversations were kept on individual employees.

Recordings were preserved for at least two years with no policies in place to safeguard their use.
According to the report, the inappropriate recording was stopped after the Inspector General's Office issued a formal "Management Alert" about the issue in May.
Sandia spokesman John German declined comment, saying management is reviewing the recommendations and findings in the report.
Sandia, managed by Lockheed Martin Corp. for the Department of Energy, designs and maintains U.S. nuclear weapons. As such, security at Sandia Labs is tight.
Federal law and Energy Department regulations permit limited recording of conversations on DOE-owned phones for counterintelligence and law enforcement purposes with written authorization.
Managers of Sandia's guard force told investigators they believed that routine recording of employee conversations was permitted because the guards had been informed of it during a meeting of all guards.
Investigators found that notification did not happen until Jan. 19, nearly two years after routine recording began.
Recording is permitted under DOE regulations when the employees are informed and give their consent. In such cases, DOE regulations require a tone every 15 seconds to remind the parties the conversation is being recorded.
The investigators found that the "beep" tones on the equipment being used at Sandia had been disabled.

The comments to this entry are closed.